Jun 19, 2012

Pretty git Log

SO you dislike git log output in console like me and do not use it... Because it looks like so:
How about this one?

It's quite easy...
Just type:

git log --graph --pretty=format:'%Cred%h%Creset -%C(yellow)%d%Creset %s %Cgreen(%cr) %C(bold blue)<%an>%Creset' --abbrev-commit --

It may be hard to enter such an easy command every time. Let's make an alias instead... Copypaste this to your terminal:

git config --global alias.lg "log --color --graph --pretty=format:'%Cred%h%Creset -%C(yellow)%d%Creset %s %Cgreen(%cr) %C(bold blue)<%an>%Creset' --abbrev-commit --"

And use simple command to see this pretty log instead:

git lg

Now in case you want to see lines that changed use:

git lg -p
In order for this command to work remove the -- from the end of the alias.

May the code be with you!

NOTE: this article is a rewritten copy of http://coderwall.com/p/euwpig?i=3&p=1&t=git and have been put here only in purpose of note to myself.  However you may use for your own needs...


UPD2: And unless you're a contributor of the git project and have written at least part of original code and/or documentation that does this trick... Then you probably stole the idea. ;) (IMHO)

9 comments:

  1. I wonder whether it was you who just ripped http://coderwall.com/p/euwpig?i=3&p=1&t=git verbatim or the other way round. One of you is not giving proper credit, though.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for note. Gave a proper credit to author of the idea here... But article is my own experience according to his one..

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    2. I implemented it as two pieces:

      git config --global alias.graph 'log --format=damn-awesome --graph'
      git config --global pretty.damn-awesome = '%Cred%h%Creset -%C(yellow)%d%Creset %s %Cgreen(%cr) %C(bold blue)<%an>%Creset'

      Delete
  2. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Something else you could try is setting the "format.pretty" config option either globally or local to the repository. That would keep you from having to use an alias.

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    Replies
    1. SO setting an alias considered 'bad'? why?

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    2. If you use both you can clean up a lot the alias definition and can reuse the format definition in other contexts:

      [pretty]
      graph = %Cred%h%Creset -%C(yellow)%d%Creset %s %Cgreen(%cr) %C(bold blue)<%an>%Creset

      [alias]
      lg = log --pretty=graph

      Delete